Police Surveillance

Baltimore police often surveil cellphones amid US secrecy

This undated handout photo provided by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office shows the StingRay II, manufactured by Harris Corporation, of Melbourne, Fla., a cellular site simulator used for surveillance purposes. A police officer testified Wednesday, April 8, 2015, that the Baltimore Police Department has used Hailstorm, a upgraded version of the StringRay surveillance device, 4,300 times and believes it is under orders by the U.S. government to withhold evidence from criminal trials and ignore subpoenas in cases where the device is used. (AP Photo/U.S. Patent and Trademark Office)BALTIMORE (AP) — The Baltimore Police Department has an agreement with the U.S. government to withhold certain information about secretive cellphone surveillance technology from the public and even the courts, according to a confidential agreement obtained by The Associated Press. On Wednesday, the department disclosed it has used the technology thousands of times since 2007.

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