Sally Yates

FBI, Justice Dept. take encryption concerns to Congress

FILE - In this Sept. 1, 2010, file photo, then-U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Georgia Sally Yates, speaks to reporters during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington. Federal law enforcement officials, including Deputy Attorney General Yates, now the No. 2 official at the Justice Department, are pressing their concerns about encryption before Congress, where they will argue to senators on Wednesday, July 8, 2015, that the right to privacy is not absolute and must be weighed against public safety interests. At issue is encryption technology in phones and computers that Silicon Valley companies say offers customers' invaluable security in their communications and protection from hackers and corporate spies. But law enforcement officials say that same technology has made it harder for them, even with a warrant, to monitor and intercept messages shared by criminal suspects. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal law enforcement officials warned Wednesday that data encryption is making it harder to hunt for pedophiles and terror suspects, telling senators that consumers’ right to privacy is not absolute and must be weighed against public-safety interests.

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