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Reflecting on progress, Obama honors civil rights

FILE 0 In this July 2, 1964, file photo, President Lyndon B. Johnson reaches to shake hands with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. after presenting the civil rights leader with one of the 72 pens used to sign the Civil Rights Act in Washington. Surrounding the president, from left, are, Rep. Roland Libonati, D-Ill., Rep. Peter Rodino, D-N.J., Rev. King, Emanuel Celler, D-N.Y., and behind Celler is Whitney Young, executive director of the National Urban League. President Barack Obama was 2-years-old when Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act. Half a century later, the first black president will commemorate what’s been accomplished in his lifetime. He’ll also recommit the nation to fighting deep inequalities that remain. (AP Photo)HOUSTON (AP) — Barack Obama was 2 years old when Lyndon Baines Johnson sat in the East Room of the White House with Martin Luther King Jr. and signed the Civil Rights Act, putting an end to an America where schools, restaurants and water fountains were divided by race. Half a century later, the first black man to become president is commemorating what’s been accomplished in his lifetime and recommitting the nation to fighting deep inequalities that remain.

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